heysawbones:

fuckyeahpixivranking:

絵のあれこれ」/「江川仮名子@通販ナウ

I don’t think I’ve been this impressed with a guide in a long time. Wow. What a great way to think about hands and feet!

itomakichan:

milodrums:

medievalpoc:

girlinfourcolors:

fantastic-nonsense:

chicketycheckyourprivilege:

militantweasel:

hauntedmarch:

itsthatawesomeperson:

when will america learn….

We won’t learn, because our education system sucks

Instead of treating kids like machines in a factory, being created into obedient workers. It looks like in Finland they’re treated like actual humans.

it’s also because all teachers there have masters’ degrees, and teaching is seen as a prestigious profession like medicine or law.

What’s actually wrong with American schools is not that they’re not like Finnish schools.
What’s wrong with American schools is that they’re an outdated relic of the early 20th century, where the object was to train a child to have the mindset required to work in a factory job long hours of the day, as at the time that mandatory public school was instituted, that was the main expectation of children.
As the industrial age faded and the US entered the era of private sector jobs, the education system failed to reflect that change, and they’re still training us to have the mindset for an industrial job, not a job in today’s job market.
The problem with American schools is not that they’re not like Finnish schools.
The problem with American schools is that they’re preparing us for jobs that no longer exist.

I keep seeing this reblogged as if that system were ever a good and positive thing for children. The American school system wasn’t designed to prepare young adults to enter the work force as free and independent agents. It was designed to indoctrinate children so that they would not complain about the dangerous, monotonous industrial work ahead of them. It was designed by factory owners with the express purpose of quelling working class revolt before it happened. It was designed to repress individual thinking and to increase dependence. Capitalists watched socialism rising up across the world and they designed American schools to ensure it would not happen here.
You want to know what kind of school you get when you apply that thinking to the modern workplace?

This is an example of a Rocketship school, charter schools that target “primarily low-income students in neighborhoods where access to excellent schools is limited.”
How do parents feel about their children being so excellently prepared for the current job market? See for yourself. These schools prey upon low-income communities, especially in areas with high Latin@/Hispanic populations. They’re becoming increasingly popular because they do exactly what the old industrial schools did: they create a workforce. After you’ve spent thirteen formative years of your life in a call center, after all, what more could you possibly want out of life? 
Education, arts, independent thinking: those things are for rich children. Stop pretending that “being prepared for jobs” is a GOOD thing to do to CHILDREN.

I wanted to share this because I think a lot of people, both inside and outside of the United states, don’t really understand just how bad our education system is, or how it’s been worsening. I’ve literally had people say stuff along the lines of “where do you get these ideas about the education system” or “everyone knows [the content of medievalpoc] so therefore you don’t have a point” (which is super weird, I know, but they still say it).
The financial model and practices for charter schools like Rocketship honestly do not differ greatly from that of say, for-profit prisons. Basically, they’re like a machine with a funnel into which you put human beings in one end, and money comes out the other. What happens to the people is really just a kind of by-product.
It’s no accident that these "schools" target poor communities of color, or that the teachers they employ are often under-qualified.
I don’t know and cannot verify any of the statements in the original graphic above about Finnish schools. What and who I am here for are the people who have received or are in the process of receiving the kind of education described above in the United States. In this kind of environment, in which textbook producers are either willing to literally rewrite history in order to pander to political, social, and financial pressures or are forced to do so, any kind of art history education is viewed as optional, much less the kind of art you see here on medievalpoc, which is rarely seen even among graduate students.
Trying to make counternarratives available to the people disenfranchised by the system-approved dominant narratives (unless you can pay for, have access to, and understand a $200,000 college education, in which case medievalpoc’s topics are considered perfectly legitimate) is as good a description of my goal in curating this blog as any.
None of what I’m describing is a “conspiracy”, other than anything inherently conspiratorial about stating facts on the way things just are. This is my starting point, and this is why I am committed to making the material here as accessible-by anyone!-as possible.

Have you seen the Singapore education? I once told a parent a child should have some fun during childhood, and he said, “No!!! He needs to learn!!”Dude, I’m 25 and I only remember the fun I had when I was young and not what I learn. In fact I hated it.

/laughs wait til you see the Malaysian education system. Most Asian education systems are memorization-based systems, and also focused on preparing children to get good jobs. It’s ingrained in Asian school students that getting As are important, and it will secure you a good future. Education isn’t so much for learning things as it is for making sure you succeed in life.
But the Malaysian education system? It’s hilarious. Just so you can see how stupid it is: we have a subject called Moral Studies meant to teach you how to be a good human being and the only way you can score on the test is to memorize the definitions of moral values WORD FOR FREAKING WORD. One word wrong and voila you get the whole fucking question wrong, yes even irrelevant words like ‘the’ and ‘and’ and ‘if’ count. It doesn’t matter if you understand what ‘responsibility’ is, if you don’t write the definition correctly, YOU GOT THE MEANING OF ‘RESPONSIBILITY’ WRONG.
We’ve also been fighting over which language to officially use for Science and Math FOR YEARS, English which is the International standard or the more patriotic national language Bahasa Malaysia (changing the names of most if not all scientific terms which makes it difficult when you start going into the field) and schools went back and forth in both languages FOR YEARS, confusing students eternally and creating a huge knowledge gap in educators because they’re suddenly forced to teach subjects in languages they’re not trained in. I learned Math in Bahasa Malaysia so when my sister comes to me for help with her math homework (which is in English), I spend at least 10 minutes trying to figure out what in Bahasa is what in English. It’s actually pretty damn stupid.
I mean there’s a million other things wrong with the system, but these are some of the issues we have that makes our education a little more unique from other Asian education systems.

itomakichan:

milodrums:

medievalpoc:

girlinfourcolors:

fantastic-nonsense:

chicketycheckyourprivilege:

militantweasel:

hauntedmarch:

itsthatawesomeperson:

when will america learn….

We won’t learn, because our education system sucks

Instead of treating kids like machines in a factory, being created into obedient workers. It looks like in Finland they’re treated like actual humans.

it’s also because all teachers there have masters’ degrees, and teaching is seen as a prestigious profession like medicine or law.

What’s actually wrong with American schools is not that they’re not like Finnish schools.

What’s wrong with American schools is that they’re an outdated relic of the early 20th century, where the object was to train a child to have the mindset required to work in a factory job long hours of the day, as at the time that mandatory public school was instituted, that was the main expectation of children.

As the industrial age faded and the US entered the era of private sector jobs, the education system failed to reflect that change, and they’re still training us to have the mindset for an industrial job, not a job in today’s job market.

The problem with American schools is not that they’re not like Finnish schools.

The problem with American schools is that they’re preparing us for jobs that no longer exist.

I keep seeing this reblogged as if that system were ever a good and positive thing for children. The American school system wasn’t designed to prepare young adults to enter the work force as free and independent agents. It was designed to indoctrinate children so that they would not complain about the dangerous, monotonous industrial work ahead of them. It was designed by factory owners with the express purpose of quelling working class revolt before it happened. It was designed to repress individual thinking and to increase dependence. Capitalists watched socialism rising up across the world and they designed American schools to ensure it would not happen here.

You want to know what kind of school you get when you apply that thinking to the modern workplace?

This is an example of a Rocketship school, charter schools that target “primarily low-income students in neighborhoods where access to excellent schools is limited.”

How do parents feel about their children being so excellently prepared for the current job market? See for yourself. These schools prey upon low-income communities, especially in areas with high Latin@/Hispanic populations. They’re becoming increasingly popular because they do exactly what the old industrial schools did: they create a workforce. After you’ve spent thirteen formative years of your life in a call center, after all, what more could you possibly want out of life?

Education, arts, independent thinking: those things are for rich children. Stop pretending that “being prepared for jobs” is a GOOD thing to do to CHILDREN.

I wanted to share this because I think a lot of people, both inside and outside of the United states, don’t really understand just how bad our education system is, or how it’s been worsening. I’ve literally had people say stuff along the lines of “where do you get these ideas about the education system” or “everyone knows [the content of medievalpoc] so therefore you don’t have a point” (which is super weird, I know, but they still say it).

The financial model and practices for charter schools like Rocketship honestly do not differ greatly from that of say, for-profit prisons. Basically, they’re like a machine with a funnel into which you put human beings in one end, and money comes out the other. What happens to the people is really just a kind of by-product.

It’s no accident that these "schools" target poor communities of color, or that the teachers they employ are often under-qualified.

I don’t know and cannot verify any of the statements in the original graphic above about Finnish schools. What and who I am here for are the people who have received or are in the process of receiving the kind of education described above in the United States. In this kind of environment, in which textbook producers are either willing to literally rewrite history in order to pander to political, social, and financial pressures or are forced to do so, any kind of art history education is viewed as optional, much less the kind of art you see here on medievalpoc, which is rarely seen even among graduate students.

Trying to make counternarratives available to the people disenfranchised by the system-approved dominant narratives (unless you can pay for, have access to, and understand a $200,000 college education, in which case medievalpoc’s topics are considered perfectly legitimate) is as good a description of my goal in curating this blog as any.

None of what I’m describing is a “conspiracy”, other than anything inherently conspiratorial about stating facts on the way things just are. This is my starting point, and this is why I am committed to making the material here as accessible-by anyone!-as possible.

Have you seen the Singapore education? I once told a parent a child should have some fun during childhood, and he said, “No!!! He needs to learn!!”

Dude, I’m 25 and I only remember the fun I had when I was young and not what I learn. In fact I hated it.

/laughs wait til you see the Malaysian education system. Most Asian education systems are memorization-based systems, and also focused on preparing children to get good jobs. It’s ingrained in Asian school students that getting As are important, and it will secure you a good future. Education isn’t so much for learning things as it is for making sure you succeed in life.

But the Malaysian education system? It’s hilarious. Just so you can see how stupid it is: we have a subject called Moral Studies meant to teach you how to be a good human being and the only way you can score on the test is to memorize the definitions of moral values WORD FOR FREAKING WORD. One word wrong and voila you get the whole fucking question wrong, yes even irrelevant words like ‘the’ and ‘and’ and ‘if’ count. It doesn’t matter if you understand what ‘responsibility’ is, if you don’t write the definition correctly, YOU GOT THE MEANING OF ‘RESPONSIBILITY’ WRONG.

We’ve also been fighting over which language to officially use for Science and Math FOR YEARS, English which is the International standard or the more patriotic national language Bahasa Malaysia (changing the names of most if not all scientific terms which makes it difficult when you start going into the field) and schools went back and forth in both languages FOR YEARS, confusing students eternally and creating a huge knowledge gap in educators because they’re suddenly forced to teach subjects in languages they’re not trained in. I learned Math in Bahasa Malaysia so when my sister comes to me for help with her math homework (which is in English), I spend at least 10 minutes trying to figure out what in Bahasa is what in English. It’s actually pretty damn stupid.

I mean there’s a million other things wrong with the system, but these are some of the issues we have that makes our education a little more unique from other Asian education systems.

(Source: too-awkward-to-live)

luminoussea:

“My mother boils seawater. It sits all afternoon simmering on the stovetop, almost two gallons in a big soup pot. The windows steam up and the house smells like a storm. In the evening, a crust of salt is all that’s left at the bottom of the pot. My mother scrapes it out with a spoon. We each lick a fingertip and dip them in the salt and it’s softer than you’d think, less like sand and more like snow. We lay our fingertips on our tongues, right in the middle. It tastes like salt but like something else, too—wide, and dark. It tastes like drowning, or like falling asleep on the shore and only waking up when the tide has come up to your feet and you wonder if you’d gone on sleeping, would you have sunk?”
The Alchemy: Salt from Water
luminoussea:

“My mother boils seawater. It sits all afternoon simmering on the stovetop, almost two gallons in a big soup pot. The windows steam up and the house smells like a storm. In the evening, a crust of salt is all that’s left at the bottom of the pot. My mother scrapes it out with a spoon. We each lick a fingertip and dip them in the salt and it’s softer than you’d think, less like sand and more like snow. We lay our fingertips on our tongues, right in the middle. It tastes like salt but like something else, too—wide, and dark. It tastes like drowning, or like falling asleep on the shore and only waking up when the tide has come up to your feet and you wonder if you’d gone on sleeping, would you have sunk?”
The Alchemy: Salt from Water

luminoussea:

“My mother boils seawater. It sits all afternoon simmering on the stovetop, almost two gallons in a big soup pot. The windows steam up and the house smells like a storm. In the evening, a crust of salt is all that’s left at the bottom of the pot. My mother scrapes it out with a spoon. We each lick a fingertip and dip them in the salt and it’s softer than you’d think, less like sand and more like snow. We lay our fingertips on our tongues, right in the middle. It tastes like salt but like something else, too—wide, and dark. It tastes like drowning, or like falling asleep on the shore and only waking up when the tide has come up to your feet and you wonder if you’d gone on sleeping, would you have sunk?”

The Alchemy: Salt from Water

argyleredhead liked your post “life thingies!”

crimscar replied to your post “life thingies!”

HOORAY GOODLUCK BITCH

leekeybeth replied to your post “life thingies!”

good luck!!!

jamiekinosian replied to your post “life thingies!”

Best of luck darling!! <3

jittermane replied to your post “life thingies!”

congrats on the job :D

THANK YOU SO MUCH MY DARLINGS! THIS MEANS A LOT!

alliebirdseed:

Hey!! I forgot to post these! Here are a few more Pokemon commissions, including my current all-time favorite one yet! I loved making that winter scene, though at the time there weren’t many pictures of Avalugg to work off of. Thanks so much for commissioning me guys!
(If you’re interested in having one made, check out over here for more details!)
alliebirdseed:

Hey!! I forgot to post these! Here are a few more Pokemon commissions, including my current all-time favorite one yet! I loved making that winter scene, though at the time there weren’t many pictures of Avalugg to work off of. Thanks so much for commissioning me guys!
(If you’re interested in having one made, check out over here for more details!)
alliebirdseed:

Hey!! I forgot to post these! Here are a few more Pokemon commissions, including my current all-time favorite one yet! I loved making that winter scene, though at the time there weren’t many pictures of Avalugg to work off of. Thanks so much for commissioning me guys!
(If you’re interested in having one made, check out over here for more details!)
alliebirdseed:

Hey!! I forgot to post these! Here are a few more Pokemon commissions, including my current all-time favorite one yet! I loved making that winter scene, though at the time there weren’t many pictures of Avalugg to work off of. Thanks so much for commissioning me guys!
(If you’re interested in having one made, check out over here for more details!)

alliebirdseed:

Hey!! I forgot to post these! Here are a few more Pokemon commissions, including my current all-time favorite one yet! I loved making that winter scene, though at the time there weren’t many pictures of Avalugg to work off of. Thanks so much for commissioning me guys!

(If you’re interested in having one made, check out over here for more details!)

sticksandsharks:

have some more old filler stuff as I scramble with exams this month.
The Adventurer Alphabet, something I started around a year ago and never finished. Messy and missing a handful of letters, but I still somewhat like the idea behind it. Might revisit and re-stylize this some day.
sticksandsharks:

have some more old filler stuff as I scramble with exams this month.
The Adventurer Alphabet, something I started around a year ago and never finished. Messy and missing a handful of letters, but I still somewhat like the idea behind it. Might revisit and re-stylize this some day.
sticksandsharks:

have some more old filler stuff as I scramble with exams this month.
The Adventurer Alphabet, something I started around a year ago and never finished. Messy and missing a handful of letters, but I still somewhat like the idea behind it. Might revisit and re-stylize this some day.
sticksandsharks:

have some more old filler stuff as I scramble with exams this month.
The Adventurer Alphabet, something I started around a year ago and never finished. Messy and missing a handful of letters, but I still somewhat like the idea behind it. Might revisit and re-stylize this some day.
sticksandsharks:

have some more old filler stuff as I scramble with exams this month.
The Adventurer Alphabet, something I started around a year ago and never finished. Messy and missing a handful of letters, but I still somewhat like the idea behind it. Might revisit and re-stylize this some day.
sticksandsharks:

have some more old filler stuff as I scramble with exams this month.
The Adventurer Alphabet, something I started around a year ago and never finished. Messy and missing a handful of letters, but I still somewhat like the idea behind it. Might revisit and re-stylize this some day.
sticksandsharks:

have some more old filler stuff as I scramble with exams this month.
The Adventurer Alphabet, something I started around a year ago and never finished. Messy and missing a handful of letters, but I still somewhat like the idea behind it. Might revisit and re-stylize this some day.
sticksandsharks:

have some more old filler stuff as I scramble with exams this month.
The Adventurer Alphabet, something I started around a year ago and never finished. Messy and missing a handful of letters, but I still somewhat like the idea behind it. Might revisit and re-stylize this some day.
sticksandsharks:

have some more old filler stuff as I scramble with exams this month.
The Adventurer Alphabet, something I started around a year ago and never finished. Messy and missing a handful of letters, but I still somewhat like the idea behind it. Might revisit and re-stylize this some day.

sticksandsharks:

have some more old filler stuff as I scramble with exams this month.

The Adventurer Alphabet, something I started around a year ago and never finished. Messy and missing a handful of letters, but I still somewhat like the idea behind it. Might revisit and re-stylize this some day.

deadbalagtas:

Hindi po ito komiks, ngunit maikling nota na hari nawa’y magbigay impormasyon sa inyo mga mabutihing mambabasa. Umuusbong ng unti-unti ang luma’t PRECOLONIAL na kultura’t paniniwalang Pilipino sa popular na kultura. Nakatutuwa ito! Isa itong hakbang patungo sa isang magandang kultural na rebolusyon na anti-kolonyal at talagang ATIN.

Kadalasan, ang representasyon sa Bathala ay lalake. Lolo level. May bigoteng MAHABA level. Levitation ang peg. Sa madaling salita: God the Father ng Kristiyanismo ang peg; Southeast Asian lang kuno si God complete with tattoos, kayumangging kutis, at nakabahag (at bakit nga ba BAHAG na Lang lagi? Seriously? You need a fashion shower. Maganda at fabulous ang lumang pananamit ng mga Pilipino. Ireserts po natin bago idrawing)

"Bat ganoon?", tanong ko sa dibuhista kong kaibigan na gumagawa ng website tungkol sa lumang relihiyon ng mga Pilipino.

"Anong bat ganoon?", binalik niya ang tanong sa akin.

"Kako, bat lalake si Bathala?"

"Bakit? Di ba siya lalake?"

At AYAN. Diyan sumisipa ang ingrained belief natin mula sa mga Kastila na ang creator god ay lalakwesh. Una po, maraming origin kwento ang Bathalang Maykapal. May nagsabing galing siya sa isang celestial coconut tree, may chika na nagbubugan sila ni Ulilang Kaluluwa, may nagsasabing siya mismo ang cosmos o ang never ending cycle ng birth and destruction.

Read More

A Look how Gender fluid and Egalitarian (Gay and Lesbians were ok before? and held positions? WOW) Philippine History was before the Spaniards came. 

By one of my favorite webcomic creators, Dead Balagtas


Architecture Studio, a new set from Lego, comes with 1,210 white and translucent bricks. More notable is what it lacks: namely, instructions for any single thing you’re supposed to build with it. Instead, the kit is accompanied by a thick, 277-page guidebook filled with architectural concepts and building techniques alongside real world insights from prominent architecture studios from around the globe. In other words, this box o’ bricks is a little different. Where past Lego products might have had the happy ancillary effect of nurturing youngsters’ interest in architecture, here, that’s the entire point.
Seventy-three different kinds of bricks are included in the set. But bricks are easy to find. It’s the guidebook that’s truly new. Its pages offer accessible overviews of basic architectural concepts, along with illustrated exercises for exploring them in Lego form. Pages on negative space and interior sections, for example, encourage budding builders to think not only about how their miniature creations look from the outside but also in terms of what sorts of spaces they contain within them.

Architecture Studio, a new set from Lego, comes with 1,210 white and translucent bricks. More notable is what it lacks: namely, instructions for any single thing you’re supposed to build with it. Instead, the kit is accompanied by a thick, 277-page guidebook filled with architectural concepts and building techniques alongside real world insights from prominent architecture studios from around the globe. In other words, this box o’ bricks is a little different. Where past Lego products might have had the happy ancillary effect of nurturing youngsters’ interest in architecture, here, that’s the entire point.
Seventy-three different kinds of bricks are included in the set. But bricks are easy to find. It’s the guidebook that’s truly new. Its pages offer accessible overviews of basic architectural concepts, along with illustrated exercises for exploring them in Lego form. Pages on negative space and interior sections, for example, encourage budding builders to think not only about how their miniature creations look from the outside but also in terms of what sorts of spaces they contain within them.

Architecture Studio, a new set from Lego, comes with 1,210 white and translucent bricks. More notable is what it lacks: namely, instructions for any single thing you’re supposed to build with it. Instead, the kit is accompanied by a thick, 277-page guidebook filled with architectural concepts and building techniques alongside real world insights from prominent architecture studios from around the globe. In other words, this box o’ bricks is a little different. Where past Lego products might have had the happy ancillary effect of nurturing youngsters’ interest in architecture, here, that’s the entire point.

Seventy-three different kinds of bricks are included in the set. But bricks are easy to find. It’s the guidebook that’s truly new. Its pages offer accessible overviews of basic architectural concepts, along with illustrated exercises for exploring them in Lego form. Pages on negative space and interior sections, for example, encourage budding builders to think not only about how their miniature creations look from the outside but also in terms of what sorts of spaces they contain within them.

(Source: s-stevens)

torterra:

a reminder for me and everyone who needs it! torterra:

a reminder for me and everyone who needs it! torterra:

a reminder for me and everyone who needs it! torterra:

a reminder for me and everyone who needs it! torterra:

a reminder for me and everyone who needs it! torterra:

a reminder for me and everyone who needs it!

torterra:

a reminder for me and everyone who needs it!

leekeybeth:

turtlefeed:

dcureton:

For those who think having a tortoise is boring

Um. 

pet kaiju leekeybeth:

turtlefeed:

dcureton:

For those who think having a tortoise is boring

Um. 

pet kaiju leekeybeth:

turtlefeed:

dcureton:

For those who think having a tortoise is boring

Um. 

pet kaiju leekeybeth:

turtlefeed:

dcureton:

For those who think having a tortoise is boring

Um. 

pet kaiju leekeybeth:

turtlefeed:

dcureton:

For those who think having a tortoise is boring

Um. 

pet kaiju

leekeybeth:

turtlefeed:

dcureton:

For those who think having a tortoise is boring

Um. 

pet kaiju

fixer-uppers:

As backed up by canon evidence. Cut for long explanation, gifs and pictures. 

Read More